Warning: This resource may contain references to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who may have passed away.

Children's games

[Episode 13 | 1888 : Victoria]

Victoria and her siblings are playing 'blind man's bluff' at the tree. She finds a marble which is claimed by her neighbour, Alexandra Owen, who lives in the big house. Victoria's family is building a new house but that is no match for Alexandra's family who have lived in this place for a long time.


History

The Australian curriculum: History

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The Australian Curriculum: History aims to ensure that students develop: 

  • interest in, and enjoyment of, historical study for lifelong learning and work, including their capacity and willingness to be informed and active citizens 
  • knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the past and the forces that shape societies, including Australian society 
  • understanding and use of historical concepts, such as evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability 
  • capacity to undertake historical inquiry, including skills in the analysis and use of sources, and in explanation and communication.

History activities [3]

Activity 1: Comparing games
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Subtheme(s): Chores, business and employment; Entertainment and games

In 1888, games played by children were different to those played today. Toys were handcrafted and many were homemade. Families that relied on a meagre income didn't spend on lavish toys. Children played many imaginary and 'made up' games outdoors.

Victoria and her siblings enjoy playing together under the Moreton Bay fig tree. Although their resources are limited, they invent games and enjoy each other's company.

Discover
  • Encourage students to recall games they play in the schoolyard and games they play indoors. Create a mindmap of games. Use an online encyclopedia, or search the internet, for a list of traditional games before you commence.
  1. What are the traditional games children play in the clip?
  2. What are some traditional games your parents or grandparents have taught you?
  3. Discuss and list other traditional games. Use the list you created to generate ideas.

Reflect

Create a comparative table with traditional games on one side and contemporary games on the other. Discuss with the class the differences between traditional and modern games played by children.


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Activity 2: Traditional games
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Subtheme(s): Entertainment and games

The concept that traditional games have a place in history and in our daily lives can be explored through a series of questions. Ask students to research the origins and rules of three traditional games.

Discover
  • Open questions: Ask students to research and respond to the following questions:
  1. Can you find out who invented these three traditional games?
  2. How inclusive are the games you researched?
  3. When and where can these games be played?
  4. Why do these games stand the test of time?
  5. Each group can share and compare their answers.

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Activity 3: Contemporary games
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Subtheme(s): Entertainment and games

The concept that modern games have a place in our daily lives can be explored through open-ended questions to help generate answers from students in groups.

Discover
  • Open questions: Ask students to research the origins and rules of at least three contemporary games.
  1. Why were contemporary games invented?
  2. How inclusive are these games?
  3. When and where can these games be played?
  4. Will these games stand the test of time?
  5. Each group can share and compare their answers.

Reflect
  • Compare and contrast answers from the open-ended questions on traditional and contemporary games. List the characteristics of both traditional and contemporary games using a Venn diagram. These can be about traditional, commonalities and modern games.

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